Plastics Associations Joining Forces

There's a spirit of collaboration among plastics associations, with alliances being formed to better work together to promote the interests of the industry. The North American Plastics Alliance (NAPA), represented by the Society of the Plastics Industry, American Chemistry Council and Canadian Plastics Industry Association, is one example. NAPA is encouraging everyone in the industry to get involved, by joining a plastics industry trade association and participating in its work; taking part in Operation Clean Sweep, the pellet-containment program; looking for opportunities to educate friends and neighbors (see www.plasticsmakeitpossible.com); becoming familiar with ways to recycle plastics in your communities; and showing influential people what you do and how you add value, for example, by inviting politicians to visit your facilities. IAPD is also teaming up with other major North American plastics associations, to better collaborate on issues that matter to our industry.

IAPD Executive Director Susan E. Avery, CAE, joined leaders from 11 other associations for a "Plastics Industry Association Executive Meeting" at NPE2012 in Orlando, FL, last month. The meeting was hosted by SPI President and CEO William R. Carteaux with the majority of leaders from the major plastics industry trade associations from the United States, Canada and Mexico in attendance. Present were Steven Russell of the American Chemistry Council, Plastics Division; Richard Doyle of The Vinyl Institute; Richard Church of the Plastics Pipe and Fittings Association; Carol Hochu of The Canadian Plastics Industry Association; Dean Thompson of Resilient Floor Covering Institute; Bruce Hollands of Uni-Bell PVC Pipe Association; Willem De Vos of the Society of Plastics Engineers; William Carteaux of Society of Plastics Industry; Luis Gerardo Alverex Espinoza of Anipac, Tony Radoszewski of the Plastics Pipe Institute; Tom Dobbins of American Composites Manufacturers Association; and Susan Avery, CAE, of the International Association of Plastics Distribution.

The gathering featured a roundtable discussion on potential areas of cooperation. All the association leaders attending the meeting agreed to a future of increased collaboration on plastics issues common to all of their constituents, including a joint effort to increase the value of their memberships and provide a unified leadership entity to the entire industry.

"IAPD has advocated the past several years for the plastics industry to collaborate on regulatory, environmental, public perception of plastics and other important issues to the collective plastics industry," said Avery. "This first meeting of the major plastics associations was met with great enthusiasm by all those in attendance. It is clear that there is a tremendous amount of work being done by the various associations and it is time to coordinate activities and support the efforts of the various associations and their respective memberships to better the plastics industry and battle the misperceptions about plastics in the minds of consumers and business customers."

The plastics industry executives will meet this summer in Washington, D.C. to continue their discussions about how to proceed with future collaboration. We will provide coverage of that meeting in a future issue of The IAPD News.

 

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