Explore Washington, D.C.

Lincoln Memorial


2 Lincoln Memorial Circle NW
Washington, D.C. 20037
washington.org

A perennial visitor favorite, the Lincoln Memorial stands at the west end of the National Mall as a neoclassical monument to America’s 16th president. A 19-foot statue of Abraham Lincoln sits overlooking the Reflecting Pool and the Washington Monument from his permanent seat on America's front yard. Dedicated in 1922, the Lincoln Memorial has been home to many defining moments in American history. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in front of 250,000 attendees.


Arlington National Cemetery


1 Memorial Avenue
Arlington, VA 22211
www.arlingtoncemetery.mil

The Arlington National Cemetery is the country’s largest military cemetery and serves as the final resting place for more than 400,000 military veterans and their immediate family from the fronts of Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as World Wars I and II, the Korean conflict, Vietnam, the Cold War and America’s Civil War.

The cemetery conducts between 27 and 30 funerals every weekday. The site is open to the public 365 days a year with free admission for those who wish to tour the site and pay their respects.

National Mall


900 Ohio Drive Southwest
Washington, D.C. 20024
washington.org

The National Mall is America’s most-visited national park, where the past, present and future come together. The monuments and memorials in this park honor American forefathers and heroes who paid the ultimate sacrifice in service to this country. From the “I Have a Dream” speech to the AIDS Quilt, the Mall is the national stage where movements and celebrations take place, where people gather to have their voices heard.

Smithsonian Museums


600 Maryland Ave SW
Washington, D.C. 20002
www.si.edu

Collectively called the Smithsonian Institution, the world-renowned museum and research complex consists of 17 museums and galleries in Washington, D.C., as well as the National Zoo. From the origins of man at the Natural History Museum to the future of space travel at the Air and Space Museum (and its bigger sister facility, the Udvar-Hazy Center), Smithsonian museums are a guide to the most fascinating aspects of our world. The museums contain nearly 140 million objects, works of art and specimens altogether. And the best part: you won’t have to pay a penny to experience it as admission is free at every location.

 

 

Smithsonian’s National Zoo


3001 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
nationalzoo.si.edu

Go wild at one of the nation’s most popular (and free) zoological parks right here in Washington, D.C. Lions, tigers, giraffes and the zoo’s beloved giant pandas are just some of the 2,000 animals that call the 163-acre park home. The zoo’s habitats feature animals from 400 different species and about 25 percent of the zoo’s residents are endangered. The National Zoo is located in DC’s residential Woodley Park neighborhood and, like all Smithsonian museums, admission is free. The main entrance (you’ll know it by the two Instagram-friendly lion statues flanking the gate) is on Connecticut Avenue.

Adams Morgan Neighborhood


washington.org

The Washington Hilton is located in the Adams Morgan neighborhood of D.C. This culturally diverse neighborhood is mostly known for its nightlife thanks to all the bars and restaurants dotting the 18th Street corridor. The energetic food scene is highlighted by Roofers Union, a top spot for gourmet brats and burgers, and the Mediterranean-meets-Caribbean Michelin star recipient Tail Up Goat

Perpendicular to the main drag down 18th Street you'll find Columbia Road, a sleepier street with can't-miss dining options like Mintwood Place, helmed by renowned chef Cedric Maupillier, which offers a French-influenced American menu.

And last but not least, visitors can sing and dance the night away at countless bars, enjoy live music at Madam's Organ, Songbyrd or Bossa before ending the night with one of Jack Rose Dining Saloon's seemingly endless whiskey selection or a visit to The Diner, open 24/7.

The Wharf


1100 Maine Avenue SW
Washington, D.C.  20024
washington.org

The revitalization of DC’s historic Southwest Waterfront community has led to one of the city’s hottest destinations for dining, shopping and entertainment – all on the water.
Home to the nation’s longest continually operating open-air fish market, The Wharf has transformed into one of DC’s most exciting waterfront destination. The sustainable entertainment, dining and retail connects the rest of the District to the Southwest Waterfront, The Wharf features an accessible riverfront, including four different piers, each with their own theme and activities. Make your way down by water, shuttle bus or bike and enjoy public piers and parks, locally grown dining concepts and a show at the city’s newest music venues. The Wharf is conveniently located only four blocks from the National Mall.

Georgetown


 

The perfect intersection of historic charm and upscale modernity happens where M Street meets Wisconsin Avenue in the heart of picturesque Georgetown.

The beauty of Georgetown’s cobblestone sidewalks, grand homes and peaceful C&O Canal are only part of the draw to this tree-lined historic neighborhood – as home to some of the city’s top shops, tastiest restaurants and most luxurious hotels, Georgetown is a favorite of tourists and locals alike. And it’s easy to see why: Though M Street may be best known for a wide-ranging retail scene that includes mainstream crowd-pleasers, the neighborhood is also home to a solid selection of upscale home design stores, independent small businesses and many of the city’s best fine art galleries.

Washington National Cathedral


3101 Wisconsin Avenue NW
Washington, D.C.  20016
washington.org

With its neo-Gothic architecture, medieval-style garden and eerie gargoyles, the city’s cathedral is worth a stop whether you’re worshipping or just looking on in wonder.

Stained-glass windows, Gothic spires and flying buttresses make the Washington National Cathedral look ages old, but the grand church was actually constructed during the 20th century. Though overseen by the Episcopal Church, the house of worship welcomes people of all faiths to its impressive site on the highest point in D.C.